Facebook Twitter Google Plus LinkedIn
protest
14
Oct

Roe V Wade & Social Work

By Rachel L. West, MSW, LMSW
The Political Social Worker

A few weeks ago I noticed the three people had been directed to The Political Social Worker after entering “how is Roe v Wade related to social work?”  I decided turn to my Twitter followers for a response.

@RidiculousMegan replied:

tweet

 

 

 

Today @SocialWorkersRJ tweeted a link to a great post written by a social work student @90christine.  Where Are Social Workers in the Abortion Debate looks at the restrictions that have been placed on access to abortion and makes a case for why social workers should be involved in the reproductive justice movement.

It’s been 40 years since the Supreme Court upheld a woman’s right to choose in Roe v. Wade, however the past three years have been steps backward in women’s reproductive rights. Over 50 clinics have closed since 2010, severely limiting a woman’s access to obtain the medical services she needs. As social workers, many of us will see women in these circumstances and it is our role to be committed to clients and their decision making processes. But where are social workers when a 16-year-old girl is denied an abortion because she is in foster care and lacks parental consent? (Court Says Nebraska Teenager Too Immature to Decide on Abortion) When she is fully aware of the financial burden of raising a child and reasonably states she couldn’t “be the right mom that [she] would like to be right now?”

You can read the post in its entirety here.

You can find out more about the role of social workers in the reproductive justice movement by visiting the blog for Social Workers for Reproductive Justice.

photo credit: ProgressOhio via photopin cc

Posted by Rachel L. West

In addition to being the founder of The Political Social Worker blog, I am a consultant. My consulting practice offers advocacy and community outreach solutions to nonprofits, social good organizations, and private practitioners. Additionally, I offer career coaching to macro social work students and professionals.

This post has no comments. Be the first to leave one!

What are your thoughts?

%d bloggers like this: